Teaching English: Tips for Private Tutors of ENGLISH

Whether you are new to the world of private tutoring or an experienced English teacher looking for ways to improve and become the successful educator you’ve always wanted to be, E-planet is here to help! Are you ready? Time to GET, GO & GROW!📌 GET organisedPrivate tutoring can be a very rewarding experience. But starting and getting organised isn’t always that easy... That’s why a new online platform, which has been especially designed for tutors of private lessons, is here to cover your needs!The E-planet Platform provides a host of free materials: weekly and monthly course plans, a series of supplements, access to the teachers’ books you need and a special panel to help you monitor each student’s progress. You can easily store the detailed information you need about all your students, keep records of their scores, check who is using the e-learning program and keep track of online midterm and final tests. Cool, right?Our user-friendly platform is already operating for European countries and it will gradually become available all around the world.📌 GO the extra mileAlways be willing to go the extra mile for your students. As you get to know them, you will find out that there are things they are passionate about and make their eyes light up. Each time they mention a hobby, a favourite film or a new book they’ve read, they offer you an opportunity to prepare an activity tailored to their interests. That’s how you will know what materials and topics to choose in order to make your lessons much more interesting for your students at every stage of their English language learning journey. Our Seasonal Activities & Topical Resources can also help you make learning motivating and enjoyable with ready-to-use materials and active engagement activities for learners of different ages, levels and interests.And when you notice your students getting bored, try a quick game, a quiz or brain teasers. Nothing kills the desire to learn more than boredom, so always be ready to shake things up! Remember that you are the one who creates the routine and chooses how to respond to student behaviour. When learning in a classroom, everything is busy and fast-paced. On the other hand, learning with the help of a private tutor, affords time for a much more personalised and fun approach. Take advantage of it! You could also use educational board games for children or adventurous games for teenagers and adults from time to time to add a little bit of unexpected fun and create a positive and uplifting atmosphere!📌 GROW your student baseConsider specialising in a particular field. For example, teaching Business English could make you stand out. In general, bear in mind that there is always demand for experts who can successfully teach English for Specific Purposes (ESP).Think outside the box. With nearly half of the world’s population using social media platforms, they’re a natural place to reach new students. Gather real-world data and learn from what other teachers do on social media. Create engaging content that students will like, comment on and share. Consider current trends and think: What do people want to view these days? For example, Instagram stories and live streaming have become quite popular. Can you incorporate these trends into your social media routine?Do you have anything you’d like to add to this list? Share your thoughts below!If you liked this blog post, you might also enjoy reading this one: 5+1 Ways to Become a Better English teacher....

January 27, 2022

Don’t Say It! (5+1 things English teachers shouldn’t say in the classroom)

What shouldn’t we say in the classroom? How can we motivate our students and keep them enthusiastic about learning English? When we know better, we do better. So, let’s get off on the right foot!❌ That’s wrong!We all know that positive reinforcement is essential, right? So, negative remarks won’t help!*What to do: If you ask a question and a student’s answer is wrong, don’t focus on that or provide the answer yourself. Give the student the chance to self-correct. Peer correction can also help to create a positive classroom atmosphere as your English learners realise that you are not the only source of correction and that they can also learn a lot from their classmates. Bear in mind that all students intuitively appreciate teachers who create a supportive and non-threatening atmosphere in the classroom.❌ Do you understand?Well, we really shouldn’t ask our students if they have understood what we’ve just explained. Most students will just say ‘yes’ even if they haven’t understood anything at all!*What to do: Check for comprehension with the help of a game, a crossword puzzle, a quiz or another fun exercise. Help your students put what they’ve learned into practice and grasp a deeper understanding of the English language! Using books with engaging, playful and creative activities can be a great source of inspiration. ❌ You’re so lazy!We’ve all heard parents and other teachers say that children and teenagers nowadays are just getting lazier and lazier. But that won’t certainly somehow magically teach our English learners what it means to try more and study hard!*What to do: Firstly, always remember that you can’t make people behave better by making them feel worse! If your students seem bored and lethargic, they may need a different approach that fits their needs in a better way. Remember that you are the one who creates the classroom routine and chooses how to respond to student behavior. So, be willing to make the necessary changes in your own classroom to create the learning environment children and teenagers need to thrive. Keep being supportive and always keep an optimistic attitude about the outcome. Moreover, bear in mind that if some of your students seem lazy or have to be constantly reminded what to do next, they may deal with a learning disability that is impeding their progress in English.❌ Because I say so.Well, it’s true that these four words can roll off our tongues really easily… But we do know that ‘Because I say so’ won’t work – at least not for long!*What to do: Always make an effort to explain, no matter how tired you are!❌ I’ve already answered that question.Our role as teachers is to motivate our students to ask questions and seek answers. There is no such thing as a stupid question. And it doesn’t matter if we’ve already answered a question!*What to do: If necessary, go over the same points again and again. Do not overwhelm your students with long and complicated sentences when giving instructions or explanations. And always remember to apply the KISS (Keep It Short and Simple) design principle in your EFL classroom (especially when teaching English to newbies)! ❌ Your brother/sister/fellow student is better than you.Comparisons can only lead to trouble. Using other people as great examples may seem like a smart way to inspire our students, but it usually leads to resentment, jealousy, and less effort.*What to do: Praising the effort of a student usually motivates him/her to try harder. in addition, your English learners should have a good idea of your expectations, so you can talk in general about what all students ought to do to make their work stand out.Do you have anything you’d like to add to this list? Share your thoughts below!And if you liked this blog post, you might also enjoy reading this one: 5+1 Ways to Become a Better English teacher. @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:3 0 0 0 1 0;}@font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-520082689 -1073697537 9 0 511 0;}@font-face {font-family:"Segoe UI Emoji"; panose-1:2 11 5 2 4 2 4 2 2 3; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:3 33554432 0 0 1 0;}p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin-top:0cm; margin-right:0cm; margin-bottom:8.0pt; margin-left:0cm; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language:EN-GB;}a:link, span.MsoHyperlink {mso-style-priority:99; color:#0563C1; mso-themecolor:hyperlink; text-decoration:underline; text-underline:single;}a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; color:#954F72; mso-themecolor:followedhyperlink; text-decoration:underline; text-underline:single;}.MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:11.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:11.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language:EN-GB;}.MsoPapDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; margin-bottom:8.0pt; line-height:107%;}div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;}...

November 25, 2021

How to Teach Your Students about Climate Change

Devastating wildfires. Prolonged droughts. Stifling heat waves. Intense hurricanes. Do you find yourself wondering how can you explain the tough reality of what is going on without terrifying young students? Are you looking for smart ways to draw attention to climate-related issues and spark some interest in the hot topic of climate change? Are you undecided as to which materials to use with your students? E-planet is here to help! Let’s encourage the next generation of climate leaders to change our world!📌Using appropriate resourcesThe first step is to find the right resources. Outdated books and obsolete information will not help. When it comes to climate change, you don’t have to be an expert; however, you have to rely on ESL books which offer high-quality and stimulating content.It’s also important to use age-appropriate materials. The feeling of powerlessness and fear when learning about major environmental problems, known as ecophobia, is a phenomenon that no teacher would like to face, so don’t scare young learners with information that might overwhelm them!Tip: Take a look at our creative Resources for English Teachers in order to find some free, innovative and ready-to-use materials on climate change. And don’t forget to explore our inspirational Seasonal Activities section for smart ideas that can help your students learn more about environmental protection and celebrate World Environment Day!📌Taking advantage of technologyThere are also many free online games, quizzes and amusing activities, which you can use in order to help your students to understand climate science in a fun and engaging way. For example, if you are teaching English to young learners, you can take a look at NASA's Climate Kids website, which tells the story of our changing planet through the eyes of the NASA missions studying Earth. What does global climate change mean? What is the greenhouse effect? What is happening to the oceans? Time to find out…📌Connecting learning to real lifeThe next step is to connect climate change to the real world. Well, it’s true that this topic may seem abstract and intangible… So, what can you do?Challenge your young students to find at least three ways to use less power on a daily basis. Ask older students to consider how their daily actions contribute to climate change. And remember to connect climate change to real stories and people, like Greta Thunberg, the well-known climate campaigner.Tip: Motivate your students to work together with their peers and don’t forget to incorporate teamwork and multiple projects in your lessons. For example, your English learners can give presentations to other students or work on poster campaigns and group art projects, while practising their English at the same time!📌Making a differenceMake sure your students stay hopeful about the future and help them to understand that we can all take action against climate change.Your goal is to inspire them, not scare them! Emphasise that we are not powerless.Challenge your students to influence others; for example, can they persuade their families members to adopt eco-friendly habits, like recycling and reusing single-use plastic items? A smart idea is to inspire them to engage in social activities, like a school recycling program.Ready to empower your students to make the world a better place? Time to take action and help them protect the planet they love! @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:3 0 0 0 1 0;}@font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536859905 -1073697537 9 0 511 0;}@font-face {font-family:"Segoe UI Emoji"; panose-1:2 11 5 2 4 2 4 2 2 3; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:3 33554432 0 0 1 0;}p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin-top:0cm; margin-right:0cm; margin-bottom:8.0pt; margin-left:0cm; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language:EN-GB;}a:link, span.MsoHyperlink {mso-style-priority:99; color:#0563C1; mso-themecolor:hyperlink; text-decoration:underline; text-underline:single;}a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; color:#954F72; mso-themecolor:followedhyperlink; text-decoration:underline; text-underline:single;}.MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:11.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:11.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language:EN-GB;}.MsoPapDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; margin-bottom:8.0pt; line-height:107%;}div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;}...

October 05, 2021

Halloween Fun in the ESL Classroom

October is here, and so is the time for pumpkins, spooky monsters, sweet treats, and Halloween activities! Well, Halloween is not only a fun holiday, but also a great way to incorporate the culture of English-speaking countries into the ESL classroom, help your learners build their language skills, and give them a little spooky excitement too! So, are you ready to start your own Halloween adventure with your students? Read on to find practical teaching ideas, which require little preparation time and can be adapted to almost all levels for children, teenagers, and adults. Travel Back inTime Why is Halloween celebrated? Since many of your students might not know much about Halloween, and for some of them this may be their first introduction to the late October holiday, start with an introductory speaking activity such as ‘How much do you know about Halloween?’. Explain that the old tradition in Scotland and Ireland dates back as far as 2,000 years ago, and that it originates from Samhain, a Celtic festival that marked the end of summer and harvest time, and the beginning of cold weather and dark days. Find the Words This super simple activity needs no preparation in advance, and it’s a great way to make your students sharpen their vocabulary skills. Divide students into two or three teams. Then choose a Halloween-related word (or a group of easy or difficult Halloween-related words – depending on your students’ level) and explain that each team has to come up with as many words as possible using the letters of that word. Don’t forget to give a time limit! Start the timer and let students rack their brains for as many words as they can come up with. The team with the most words wins. Create a Tutorial Ask your students to work in groups in order to create the best Halloween tutorial. They could focus on a topic like ‘How to carve a pumpkin’, ‘How to design the perfect Halloween costume’, etc. Then they have to show it to the class, which will vote for the best tutorial! Write About It This activity is ideal for teens and adults, since it’s an open secret that almost all older students like a good scary story! Explain that they should write a story set during Halloween and that it should create a spine-tingling sensation in the reader. To help them start a good story, you can give them some fun writing prompts, e.g. ‘Your English teacher is a zombie / monster / vampire, but no one seems to get it’ or ‘When the local police officer goes to investigate the haunted house down the street, he finds an old lady who was murdered decades ago.’. You could also use spooky mystery background music during writing time as a bonus! Tip: If your older students are bored with celebrating Halloween every year, just change the writing activity. Why not take advantage of Jack Skellington, the main character in the story ‘The Nightmare before Christmas’? Jack lives in Halloweentown, where everybody else loves the late October holiday, but when he visits Christmas town, he decides it would be great for everyone in his town to celebrate Christmas instead… Read the story or watch the film with your students, and then have them write a fun descriptive essay or review about it! Decorate It Last but not least, don’t forget to get your younger learners to help you decorate all classrooms to set the scene! Another good idea is to ask them to make paper masks – and even paint or decorate a mask they’re already wearing in order to help slow the spread of COVID-19! That’s not only fun, but also a good way to review useful vocabulary for face parts, colours, scary animals, etc. A competition can also be held, and prizes be given for the funniest or the scariest mask! Enjoy It Now it’s time to bring the fun and excitement of the celebration into your classroom... Shake things up! Teaching doesn’t always mean that you have to explain vocabulary or grammatical concepts. Why not help your students experience something new and exciting? Have you got any other favourite Halloween activities ideas? Share them with us in the comments below! And if you found these ideas helpful, give this post a quick share on your favourite social media site.Happy Halloween!...

October 19, 2020

Back to School: Creating a Welcoming Classroom

August is still here, but it will soon be school time again! So, you may be wondering how to help students see the future school year in a positive light. Well, the environment we create for our English language learners is as important as what we teach and the strategies we use. All recent studies indicate that high-quality classroom environments spur creativity and help students to feel more motivated to engage in the learning process. So, before another school year starts, let’s find out how we can create a happy place for all learners! The Seating Chart It goes without saying that desks arranged in neat, orderly rows make movement throughout a classroom easier. However, sitting in a row of desks in front of a teacher may feel intimidating to a school-aged child. A horseshoe-shaped formation or flexible clusters can help to create a more friendly and inviting environment. After all, a more student- centred classroom design - away from traditional classroom layouts - is more conducive to 21st-century learning, where collaboration, communication and project-based activities are becoming the norm. So, when rethinking your classroom design, look for ways to provide comfortable and collaborative spaces. In any case, bear in mind that all students should be able to move around easily. The Decorative TouchesMost classrooms tend to be cold and bare areas until they are decorated. That’s because adding a splash of colour can bring life to a sterile environment and create a positive learning place. Keep in mind that light blue and green can help learners to feel calm, while dark colours may make them feel drowsy. A bright and vibrant corner with things students need but often forget, like pens and sharpened pencils, highlighters and post-it notes is always a good idea. A white wall where students can present and hang their work throughout the academic year is essential, too. And don’t forget to use a large bulletin board where items, collages and students’ projects on English culture can be pinned! Last but not least, a reading and educational board games nook will always make a classroom much more interesting. Motivational posters with success quotes not only help to inspire English learners to study harder, but they also reinforce a positive culture. For example, ‘It always seems impossible until it’s done’ is a quote by Nelson Mandela that could work wonders in a classroom! But stay away from posters with negative words and expressions that tell students what not to do. For example, instead of a ‘No bullying!’ message, prefer a ‘Be a hero and help them all!’ approach. Plants can also help to add warmth and comfort to a class environment, and numerous studies have shown that adding a pet (like fish or a tiny hamster) to a learning environment has a positive effect on the psychology of students. However, some of your students may suffer from allergies, so you should check with them before adding a new plant or pet to the classroom. The Health & Safety Factor In the age of coronavirus, this is a factor that cannot be neglected. Since older students are more likely to remember to follow health and safety protocols than younger ones, why not use a colourful poster to remind all your English language learners to always wash their hands after breaks and to use hand sanitizers? Portable hand-sanitizing stations at main entrances can also promote regular hygiene, especially if you have lots of young students who have an almost infinite capacity for making messes and spreading germs! Sometimes, even the smallest of changes can make a big difference in a classroom environment. So, are you ready to help your students feel empowered to learn? Do you have any other suggestions for creating a welcoming and inviting classroom environment? Just add them to the comments below! And don’t forget to spread the word; give this article a quick share on your favourite social media site! If you liked this, you might also enjoy the article 5+1 WAYS TO BECOME A BETTER ENGLISH TEACHER....

August 22, 2020

5+1 Ways to Become a Better English Teacher

Are you wondering how you can become the enthusiastic, inspirational and successful educator you’ve always wanted to be? We’ve got you covered! Read on to find out what it takes to become a great teacher… 1. Make Learning Fun Shake things up! Teaching doesn’t always mean that you have to explain vocabulary or grammatical concepts. Why not help your students experience something new and exciting? Everyone learns more effectively when they have fun because they focus more on the present activity rather than on the learning itself. For example, songs and games are a very entertaining way to learn English. You can also turn boring activities into contests with positive reinforcements, like prizes or additional game time. And did we mention that stories are a great way to grab the attention of your young students? 2. Put Technology to Good Use Think about all the devices you use on a daily basis. In today’s world, technology has a profound effect on numerous aspects of our lives – and this includes teaching. Embrace the different ways technology can contribute to the learning process. At the click of a button, your students will be able to explore an amazing digital world that can help them develop their language skills. Coursebooks and workbooks are important but why not add more variety to your lesson and homework assignments? Your students will be grateful! 3. Be Flexible One of the tenets of teaching should be that nothing stays constant. A flexible attitude is vital. When a lesson is not going as planned, learn how to adjust quickly and tackle any problem that you might come across. Remember that it’s not uncommon for a meticulously mapped out lesson to come out differently from what you had planned. Embrace unexpected challenges as new opportunities for you and your students. By keeping an open mind and an open heart, you won’t just be a good teacher but also a great role model for them. 4. Challenge Your Students Nothing kills the desire to learn more than boredom! Make sure that you keep your students challenged. However, you need to make sure you find the right balance and that your teaching goals are ambitious but also realistic. You want to set high standards for your students, so that they will always do their best and gain more knowledge. But these standards should be within their reach. Get to know your learners and their ages, skills and learning styles. Everyone has different strengths and weaknesses. As a teacher, you may have the chance to interact with students at different stages of development and from all walks of life. Personalise your lessons to fit your learners’ needs. 5. Develop a Positive Attitude and a Sense of Humour An upbeat mood and sense of humour make a lasting impression. Students intuitively appreciate teachers who create a joyful, supportive and non-threatening atmosphere in the classroom. Keep in mind that laughter is a significant part of being human. It facilitates social bonding and creates a feeling of well-being. It improves physical health by decreasing the level of stress hormones and boosting immune cells that fight illness. A loud infectious laugh can sometimes keep learners engaged and interested; it can also help them feel like they are part of a great team! 6. Reflect on Your Teaching It is easy for teachers to spend so much time focused on their students’ progress that they forget to consider their own performance. But with a profession as challenging as teaching, self-reflection allows you to think more deeply about what works in the classroom and what doesn’t. No matter how interesting a lesson is, the strategies that you use can always be improved. Fresh and innovative methods can make students happier and much more attentive. What do you think makes a great teacher? What are your favourite tips regarding ELT (English Language Teaching)? Let us know in the comments below! If you liked this, you might also enjoy the article Real Stories - What’s It Like Teaching English?...

March 26, 2019

How to Prepare Students for Online Learning

Students who are new to online learning may, at first, find this type of learning a little disorientating since they are used to a physical space and the physical presence of a teacher. Some may also make the mistake of thinking that online learning requires less of an effort but in fact it is quite difficult for students to motivate themselves to study at their own convenience. This can all be made a little easier with preparing them for learning English online. Clarify Computer Skills and Technical Terms When introducing students to an online course you should first provide guidelines on the requirements needed, both in terms of hardware/software and in terms of computer skills. This will provide students who are not so computer savvy with an opportunity to brush up on their skills before starting the course and to ask any questions they might have beforehand. You might also want to provide a walk-through worksheet or document that goes through step-by-step the technical tasks that might be required of them. Maybe you have been using the same online course of software for years but to some people it may be completely new. If you find it difficult to get into the mindset of a beginner, it might be useful to approach a student who you think might have difficulties and offer to coach them so you can see where the biggest problems lie. A good handout should include: - How to access the course - Instructions on how to use every part of the course - Where to seek help if needed Once you have developed a handout, you might want to schedule one or two orientation sessions that combine teaching computer basics and becoming familiar with the online course. This way you can see if there is anything essential that your handout is missing. An orientation session also provides a way of introducing yourself to your students and if it is a group activity provides a way of developing a community. Explain how independent online learning is different to instructed learning Whether you are teaching online or offline, you will also want to explain to your students how their self-paced learning fits into the other course activities you do. You should explain how lessons, discussions, lectures can be combined with the self-paced online course to achieve their learning outcomes. The students should see that the course isn't an optional add-on but fundamental to reinforcing what is being taught by the teacher. Since students know how long lessons instructed by a teacher are, you should provide a guideline time for how long an online unit should take, so that students can easily at this into their schedule. You might even want to provide students with a schedule or plan that features the online course so students can see where the online course fits in. An advantage of online learning is that students must learn to read texts extremely carefully. While students might find this difficult at first it encourages them to learn and study independently as well as make decisions more quickly because they don't have a teacher to rely on for clarification. Provide Clear Instructions and Clarify Your Expectations As well as providing an orientation session and general guidelines, much like with setting homework, you should provide - a basic description of the online task, e.g. please complete the listening task of unit 2, you will listen to three speakers talking about their jobs and then have to answer true of false questions based on what you have heard. - how it relates to the rest of the course and their learning outcomes, e.g. this will enable you to listen to and understand vocabulary related to professions. - how long the task should take and when it should be done by, e.g. it shouldn't take you any longer than 30 minutes to complete and I would like you to finish it for next lesson. - what to do if they have technical problems and what to do if they have task-related problems, e.g. if you have technical problems, please contact the technical support and if you have problems completing the task, please send me a message. You should also be clear about how much participation you require from students and what weighting this could have on their overall grade. A gentle reminder from you before a task is due should encourage students to keep up with their online course activities. Provide Teacher to Student Feedback By talking about the exercises and activities contained within an online course, students will be able to see, that even though they are studying on their own, they are not alone. A teacher might want to set aside time either within the lesson, or a few minutes after the lesson to go through the correct answers of an online course. This will eliminate any technical or computer-related issues fairly quickly and will help students to see where they went wrong and improve for next time. And there we have it, if you've followed all these tips, you should have successfully prepared students for online learning and make the most of a blended approach to learning. Additionally, our e=learning program, Learn English, can be combined with traditional instructional teaching using our textbooks to achieve this blended learning approach. Click here for more information or contact us for more details....

June 08, 2017

5 Countries with the Best Salaries for English Teachers

If you’re interested in teaching ESL abroad, there is a huge demand for ESL teachers all over the world. One of the key reasons for this is that the expat lifestyle appeals to many adventurers who want to experience living in a foreign country for a long period of time. Traditionally, arranging all the details to work and live in a foreign country is difficult, but teaching ESL streamlines the process to make it easy. To prove how big the market is for ESL teachers, here are five countries where markets are red hot. United Arab Emirates The United Arab Emirates right now is booming. If you google the city of Dubai, shining, new skyscrapers soar into the sky and high-end sports cars appear to be the status quo. This, of course, is a result of the oil industry which has resulted in a booming economy across the board. The pay here is by far the highest in the world at up to $4,000 a month, but the living expenses may be more expensive than a country such as China. If you’re looking for a job in the UAE, dig into the potential salaries, living expenses, and the benefits of your job such as housing costs to make sure you can save some of the money you have earned. Potential Salary: $4,000 per month Oman Teaching English in Oman is pretty unique because it’s completely tax free! There’s a range of great teaching positions all the way from the early kindergarten levels to advanced grades and private schools. Teaching English in Oman may actually be the best place to go to save money or pay off student loans because they offer wonderful benefits, such as low-cost housing. As for the country itself, it’s known for its friendly people, life on the Arabian Sea, and booming economy. This is a wonderful country to live and work in. Potential Salary: $3,500 per month South Korea Another country that is economically flourishing is the country of South Korea. Finding teaching jobs in South Korea is quite easy and information about the jobs is readily available. In South Korea you can expect a comfortable lifestyle, great job benefits including free housing, and a fun living experience where you can try exciting new foods and hang out with friendly locals. Potential Salary: $2,500 per month + housing Thailand Thailand is a backpacker's dream due to the vibrant culture and cheap living expenses. If you’re an ESL teacher, it’s possible to live on as little as $15 per day, which will help you to save up a lot of money and still get a great cultural experience. Thailand is known for its beautiful beaches and great nightlife scenes. The country is also incredibly backpacker friendly, so it will be easy to meet people from all around the world while you’re there. Teaching English in Thailand will be an experience that you won’t forget anytime soon. Potential Salary: $2,000 per month China China is the largest ESL market in the world by far with hundreds of thousands of ESL learners, so there are always countless job openings if you’d like to teach English in China. The living expenses and salaries differ depending on the area of the country you’re in. Because of the size of China, you can easily find work in any part of the country from the countryside to the bustling cities that seem to never sleep. If you’d like to teach in China, then it’s suggested that you find an agent to go through. Due to the fact that there are so many jobs on offer, there is a lot of noise to sort through in order to find the best ones. An agent will have great resources for finding you a job that comes with benefits and is in an area you will enjoy. Potential Salary: $2,000 per month No matter where in the world you choose to go, you’re going to have a wonderful experience that you remember for the rest of your life. It’s so difficult to come by great opportunities in life that allow you to live in another country for years and through ESL you’ll be able to live and work in the country of your dreams....

May 26, 2017

Using Poetry with English Language Learners

Why Teach Poetry? Poetry can really liven up the classroom and because of the wide variety of styles and topics, every student is bound to find a poem that they love. Poetry can also expose students to authentic English that is used in real life situations. Students can also see how words can be used freely and creatively which opens their minds up to the possibility of what they can do with the English they already know. Poetry can also be used along with other materials when you are introducing new vocabulary, new language structures and even more sophisticated writing such as rhyming. Also, short poems can explore an idea using a shorter amount of text than a story or an essay. Many English Language Learners come from backgrounds with a rich literary culture, exploring translated versions of these poems can enable language learners to share their culture and feelings with fellow students. Where Can I Find Poems? Thanks to the internet, finding poems is very easy. You can simply search for a topic or if you remember some lines of a poem you would like to use, you can simply type this into a search engine and you should be able to find the poem in the search results. There are also some specific, level-appropriate poetry lesson plans from the British Council. What Do I Need to Consider When Choosing a Poem? The main thing to think about when choosing a poem is the level of language in your class. If you have to explain most of the poem then chances are this won't be the fun activity it should be. However, students don't have to understand every single word, as long as they understand the overall meaning of the poem. Of course, you should think about what might be difficult for your students before the lesson and plan on pre-teaching some of the vocabulary, or giving visual aids for some phrases. Activities Using Poetry Spotting differences between poems and stories - find a poem and a short story on the same topic. Get students to read the two in groups and make a note of the differences in length, style, content and get them to share them with other students in the class. Also, ask them to discuss which they prefer and why. Illustrating a poem - Get students to work in pairs. Give the same poem to all pairs and get the students to read the poem in pairs and then illustrate the poem to show its meaning in pictorial form. The students should then present their illustrations and describe what they think the poem means to the other students. Discussing a topic - Poetry can be used along with other materials to help introduce new vocabulary related to a topic. It can also be a chance to go into the language in more depth. You can explore ideas such as why the poet chose this word? How does the word make you feel? Students might want to pick one word or phrase that they like the most from a poem and work in pairs to write down as many other similar words or expressions as possible. Students can then share their findings with the class. Reading out loud - Choose a short, lively poem for your class and read it aloud together once. Then divide students into pairs and get them to perform the poem. You'll need to get them to think about what the overall meaning is and how they should use their voice and expressions to convey this meaning. An example of a good poem to use surrounding the word "hope" would be: “Hope” is the thing with feathers - Emily Dickinson “Hope” is the thing with feathers - That perches in the soul - And sings the tune without the words - And never stops - at all - And sweetest - in the Gale - is heard - And sore must be the storm - That could abash the little Bird That kept so many warm - I’ve heard it in the chillest land - And on the strangest Sea - Yet - never - in Extremity, It asked a crumb - of me. You can find additional resources for World Poetry Day and for using poetry in the classroom in general: Lesson Plan: Using Poetry to Teach Reading Poetry Month Resources...

March 19, 2017