Staycation & Learning English

How often do you find yourself daydreaming about visiting the exotic or far-flung place on your desktop wallpaper? However, the years 2020 and 2021 have been very strange, to say the least, and our world is still facing a pandemic. Taking a trip abroad and making exciting travel plans is not always easy! But what if you said yes to a staycation?The term staycation is formed by combining ‘stay’ and ‘vacation’, so it is actually a portmanteau word (a term formed by combining two other words). And it sounds cool, doesn’t it? If you just need to get away from it all, that’s your favourite new word in English! So, are you ready to kill two birds with one stone? Look no further! This summer you can stay right where you are, save money and improve your English.📌 Become a TouristHow can you get a renewed sense of the place you call home? Pick up an English travel guide and explore a new site you haven’t visited before. You can always discover (or rediscover) the beauty of the area you live in. There’s so much to see … right on your doorstep!Tip: Are there any nearby popular tourist spots you’ve never been to? Walking tours in English can also help you not only find hidden treasures and secret nooks and crannies, but also meet new people.📌Become a BookwormSummer is the best time to enjoy a great book in English, especially if you are heading to the beach. However, if a good beach near you is not an option, perhaps you can set up a colourful hammock in your garden or lay out a picnic blanket in a park and relax with a new book.Tip: Comics and graded readers are great options if you think that reading a novel in English might be too hard for you.📌 Become a (Board) GamerFamily bonding and board games go hand in hand! Educational board games for children or adventure games for teenagers andadults are here to help everyonemaster the English language.Tip: Not interested in board games? No problem! Crosswords, brain teasers and puzzles are another great way to expand your vocabulary. If you can’t travel abroad, say yes to a 3D puzzle of a famous building or landmark in an English-speaking country. For example, you can build your own model of one of the best-known bridges in the world: Tower Bridge.📌 Become a FoodieCuisine can sometimes offer excellent insights into a country’s history and culture. For example, England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales have their own food identity and, therefore, their own special dishes. So, why not take advantage of this staycation to try your hand at a traditional recipe that will let your taste buds travel without leaving home?Tip: You can also take some time for a special meal that you don’t have to cook. Is there a good British, Irish, Australian or Canadian restaurant in your area? Time to find out!📌 Become a Tech FanWhy not use technology to practise your English? For example, there are thousands of videos on YouTube, which could help you have fun and work on your listening skills at the same time. Netflix and other online streaming services can also be a treasure. Read our blog post ‘How toUse Netflix to Learn English’ , grab some popcorn andprepare to sharpen your language skills!Tip: OK, let’s not forget that getting back to the basics could be useful too. What do we mean? Well, reading magazines in English or watching foreign television series is a classic and time-tested way to quickly improve language learning.If you are wondering how you can help your little ones practise their English too, add these clever ideas, which combine fun and learning, to your cool ‘8 Summer Learning Ideas For Young English Learners’. @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:3 0 0 0 1 0;}@font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-469750017 -1073732485 9 0 511 0;}@font-face {font-family:"Segoe UI Emoji"; panose-1:2 11 5 2 4 2 4 2 2 3; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:3 33554432 0 0 1 0;}p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin:0cm; margin-bottom:.0001pt; line-height:18.0pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}.MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:11.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:11.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}.MsoPapDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; line-height:18.0pt;}div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;}...

July 28, 2021

6 Tips to Improve Your Listening and Speaking Skills

Listening to a foreign language is often quite challenging and demanding. That’s why the majority of students find listening to be the most difficult language learning skill. Do you feel the same way? You are not alone! But what can you do to overcome this difficulty? Should you read a text while you are listening to it or not? What type of audio should you choose? Do you need to translate every single word? And how can you be sure that you are developing your skills in the right way? We’ve got you covered; time to be all ears! Here is your new ‘listening manifesto’! Say ‘Yes’ to Active Listening Passive listening, i.e. listening to something without giving it your full attention, will not help you much. For example, you may listen to English songs while cooking, doing the dishes or eating without really paying attention to the lyrics. That’s not bad; you can still pick some things up every now and then, when a particular word or phrase catches your attention. But unless you actually focus on what you’re listening to, most of it goes in one ear and out the other! Listen to Native Speakers Native speakers often ‘connect’ and ‘link’ words together when they speak. For example, in American English, the phrase ‘what’s up?’ often sounds like ‘wassup?’. This practice isn’t unique to English speakers; French learners might recognise this as a ‘liaison’. That’s why sometimes you may know a word but will not recognise it when you hear it; many words sound different when pronounced by native speakers! So… learning new words but never hearing them isn't sufficient when it comes to real-life conversation. Studying pronunciation and listening go hand in hand if you want to avoid feeling lost in the flow of any dialogue. Use the Right Tools Binge-watching interesting YouTube channels and popular TV shows, enjoying scenes from a film (with or without subtitles), listening to a podcast episode you have a transcript for… these are great ways to develop the feeling of a language and to improve your accent along the way. Start with material you easily understand, and then as you make progress, gradually increase the difficulty of your audio choices. Accept the fact that you are not going to understand everything; it's not necessary to do so in order to get the gist of the meaning. In fact, learning to do that is a key skill! An extra piece of advice: If you are a beginner, watch films that you've already seen in your mother tongue; already knowing the plot will help tremendously! Speak! Make a conscious effort to speak more often. You don’t have to sound perfect! Speaking in a one-on-one situation forces you to concentrate. Interactive listening is best; in other words, it's better to talk with someone in a two-way conversation, rather than to just listen to a recorded TV show. Try to chat with native speakers as they are the ones who can easily correct your mistakes. An extra piece of advice: Native speakers talk super-fast! When conversing with them, politely ask them to slow down. Speak & Record Yourself You can record yourself speaking English using your computer or phone. This may sound funny, but it can actually help you improve your skills. Continue to do this until you feel happy with the results. Be Patient Listening and speaking skills, like all good things, take time to develop. You simply cannot improve at lightning speed – nobody can! There are no magic methods that offer maximum results with minimum effort. You will gradually understand hard and complex native-level materials as you improve at the appropriate pace – without getting disappointed or frustrated! Every day, with each extra repetition, your comfort level will grow. So... what do you think? Are there any new techniques you've never tried? In what other ways do you work on your listening comprehension? Let us know in the comments section below; this way everyone can benefit from your ideas! If you liked this article, you might also like to read ‘5 Tips to Study More Effectively’. And if you enjoyed this post, please give it a quick share on Facebook or your other favourite social media!...

February 04, 2019

IELTS - What is the hype all about?

If you have ever dreamt of applying to an international study programme, aspired to work in an English-speaking organisation or company, or to travel all over the world, the IELTS exam is ideal for you! IELTS stands for International English Language Testing System. Passing exams in this System is considered as proof of English language fluency worldwide and is a requirement for most educational, professional and immigration purposes in more than 140 countries. The IELTS exam prepares you for real-life situations with native English speakers, by applying speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. It is designed to make sure you can speak comfortably with fellow students in an international school, to clients at work or to other people on a trip abroad. Although there is no failing or passing limit, there are specific criteria for each test to make sure that your exact level of fluency is correctly assessed. Most universities and workplaces require a score of 7 to be accepted. If you score below 6 it may be suggested by the university or company that you retake the exam. The same score system is used globally so the results you receive have the same value in every country. IELTS provides two kinds of exams, making it adaptable for specific needs. IELTS Academic is for people who want to apply to a university or to find a job in an English-speaking country. IELTS General Training is suitable for training or attending seminars at a diploma level. It can also be used for traveling, or living and working in an English-speaking country. IELTS is an exam which will open doors for you in the future. Attending an IELTS course can provide you with everyday life knowledge and capability to communicate easily with people all over the world!...

April 18, 2018

Blended Education

We strongly believe in effective and flexible education that caters for all learning styles. Each learner has a different schedule, learning style and pace. This is why we, at E-planet Educational Services, are firm believers in blended education. As time passes, we notice that it is almost impossible to do any kind of learning without the implementation of technology. The internet has now become a part of our everyday life, we depend on it for numerous tasks including education. Blended education, or hybrid learning as it has also come to be known, is a method of education that allows students of all ages, to participate in a steady and flexible programme. It combines the traditional classroom setting with self paced online sessions. This way, our instructors, equipped with modern and effective teaching skills, are available to explain and assist with the harder, more complex topics. They can give their expert knowledge on new subjects through co-dependent, pre-scheduled lessons in a classroom setting. Our online training provides advanced digital media sources. Loaded with e-books, videos, recordings, exercises and tests it gives students unlimited access to knowledge and immediate results, as the exercises and tests are graded automatically, giving students the opportunity to control their learning pace. This mix of strategies is cost effective, as online material can be reviewed over and over according to one’s needs and flexibility, as each individual can choose the time, place and also the pace of their online study time. In the year 2000 it was estimated that 45.000 people took online courses. In 2010 that number rose to over 3.000.000. Today it is almost a given that people will either turn to the internet for education or combine both technology and face to face interaction. A study by Garrison and Kanuka (amongst others) concludes that “blended learning … has the proven potential to enhance both the effectiveness and efficiency of meaningful learning experiences.” We are able to provide the best of these two worlds. We strive to have carefully planned material, expertly trained instructors and classrooms that include the most advanced equipment. Our online material and hard copy books blend together perfectly and support each other completely for the best possible learning experience. Blended education has proved itself to be a complete and fully integrated method of learning for all kinds of individuals. Regardless of age and pace, it is fun, effective and all inclusive. We are proud to be a part of this amazing process....

February 25, 2018

The English Learners Guide: 5 Most Confused Words in the English Language

Whether you're studying for an English language exam or not, everyone should learn these commonly confused words. Even native speakers will sometimes need to search for the correct word they want to use. So, don't be dismayed if you have to do the same. But, to prevent you from having to search any longer, here we present the most commonly confused words in the English language that you should learn and be able to distinguish between. Affect/Effect Right at the top of the list is the ultimate culprit of confusion in the English language, making nearly everyone think at least twice before making their choice in written English. Put simply, affect is usually a verb, effect is usually a noun. One trick is to substitute either 'alter' or 'result' into the sentence. If alter seems right, use affect and if result seems to fit, use effect. The strike affected the nation's economy. The strike altered the nation's economy. The medicine had an immediate effect. The medicine had an immediate result. Advice/Advise Advice is a noun, advise is a verb. My accountant always gives me good financial advice. Charlie advised me to leave half an hour early to avoid the traffic. Complement/Compliment A complement is something that completes something else. It’s used to describe pairs or groups of things that go well together. It's not a surprise that John and Sara are getting married, their personalities complement each other perfectly. Compliment is used when praising or saying something nice about someone. I just wanted to compliment you on the wonderful speech you gave tonight. Hung/Hanged A confusion between these two can mean something completely different and you don't want to get this wrong. Hung is the past of the verb to hang, most of the time. The washing should be dry now as I hung it outside this morning. Hanged is the exception. It’s the past tense of hang as well but only used in one situation. Hang can also mean to execute a criminal by hanging them with a rope. In this case, the past tense of hang is hanged. The last time someone was hanged was in 1964. Disinterested/Uninterested Many people think that these two words mean the same thing: bored or not interested. While this is certainly the meaning of uninterested, it's not the meaning of disinterested. Disinterested means impartial, objective and not taking a side in an argument. I was uninterested in languages when I was at school. A lawyer should provide disinterested advice. Even if you know the difference many other people will not, so be sure to listen closely to the whole conversation because if someone says disinterested, they may mean uninterested. It's a common mistake and even those who grew up with the English language will not be able to make this distinction. If you liked this article you may also want to Learn how to order coffee in English like a local....

November 08, 2017

How to order coffee in English like a local

One of the most common meeting points for students, friends and even coworkers is a coffee shop. If you can’t order the kind of coffee you want correctly, it can be embarrassing. So, why be embarrassed when it is an easy thing to learn? We've put together some phrases to help you order a cup of coffee in English like a local. If you love coffee, you probably look forward to ordering, so make sure you get it right. The first thing you should do when entering the shop is to look at the menu. When you've decided what you're having you can go to the counter. There the person working at the coffee shop will greet you by saying something like "Hello, what can I get you?" or "Hello, what would you like?" You can then respond by saying the following: I would like a ... I would like a cup of ... The next thing you want to say is the size of coffee you would like. Traditionally there are three standard sizes: small, medium and large. Some coffee shops have their own sizing such as Starbucks, where small, medium and large are called tall, grande and venti. However you will be understood if you say small, medium and large, so it's best to learn these and stick to them. The next thing you want to mention is the type of coffee you want. Here are the most common coffee types: Espresso – strong black coffee without milk. If you want more, you can order a double espresso. Latte - black coffee and steamed milk Cappuccino – the most common type of coffee that people enjoy drinking, which includes steamed milk and milk froth Mocha – black coffee served with steamed milk and chocolate syrup Be careful when ordering an espresso; most people, even native speakers, pronounce the word wrongly saying ex- instead of es-. Then you should state if you want any sugar in your coffee and how much. Next comes the type of milk you want. Most modern coffee shops and chains will have a few milk options. The standard milk added to the coffee is whole milk, but you can ask if they have low-fat. If you’re lucky, they might even have organic milk. Another type of milk they might have is soy - a plant-based milk produced by soaking soy beans. The last option is especially good for lactose intolerant people, who can’t easily digest animal milk, and for vegans, who don’t consume animal products. Then you can choose a flavor or topping. You might want to add something to your coffee to make it a little bit special, such as chocolate, caramel, hazelnut, or vanilla syrups. Most coffee shops also have the option to add whipped cream (chantilly) or even ice cream. So if you add all this together you would ask for a coffee in this order: size, type of coffee, sugar, milk, toppings. For example: "I would like a medium cappuccino, no sugar, low-fat milk and some hazelnut syrup, please." Some coffee shops will also give you the option to sit in, or to take away. To stay in the coffee shop, you can say "for here" or "to sit in." To take the coffee with you with you, say "to take away" or "to go." Sometimes, they might not have the coffee you want, or you may want to eat something too, or perhaps you would like to ask about the drinks they have. So, here are some more basic phrases for ordering: “Hello. I’d like a double espresso, please.” “Could I have a large cappuccino to go?” “Can I get a medium latte for here?" “I’ll take a small mocha, please.” To ask about the menu you can say "Hello. Do you have…?" You'll also want to be prepared to answer questions from the barista (the person who works at the coffee shop), especially if you haven't already said more details about what you would like. For example they may ask you: "What size would you like?" “A (small/medium/large), please.” "Would you like anything else?" "No, thanks. That's all/it." "Yes, can I have a chocolate muffin as well?”" "Is that for here or to go?" “To go, please.” “For here, please.” If it’s your first time in a specific coffee shop, you might not be aware of its etiquette, especially if it’s a place like Starbucks. Here are a few things to keep in mind: - The barista might not put sugar in your coffee, you might have to put it in yourself. You might be given sugar on the side in sachets or there might be sugar at the counter. If you can’t see those, you should ask "can I have some sugar, please?", or "where can I find the sugar?" - The cashier might ask for your name so they can call you when your coffee is ready. If not, they might call your order, so remember to listen out for that. - If you just order "coffee", it will be strong black coffee, so remember the terms above to be more specific if you want something different. - If you need more time to decide when you get to the counter, don’t worry, just let the person behind you go in front. You can gesture for them to go in front or say "You can go ahead, I'm still deciding." With these phrases you'll be more than ready to order the perfect coffee in English like a local....

October 06, 2017

How to Engage English Learners After a Long Break

Holiday breaks are often much needed for many of us but it can be hard to return to work and study afterwards. Read on to learn how this post-break period can affect English learners and pick up some tips on how to motivate them after a long time out of the classroom. The Effects of Holidays Time off from studying represents a huge distraction for young and old alike. It's normal that after a long holiday, students return to the classroom feeling sluggish and not in the right frame of mind to start learning straight away. Fortunately, there are some strategies you can adopt to make sure this post-break feeling and attitude doesn't last and to help you reconnect with your English learners once again. Prepare for a Fresh Start As usual, preparation plays the most important role. Remember to time class topics and projects so that they finish before the holidays start. You and your students can then spend your break relaxing rather than worrying about about keeping certain topics fresh in their mind. If your students want to recap topics that's up to them and should be encouraged however you should start of with new concepts that don't require revision. Encourage Self-Study Just because you and your students are not physically present, doesn't mean the learning stops. Holidays, especially long breaks provide opportunities for students to explore their own educational interests and needs. One idea might be to set a challenge or project that can be completed over the break but that couldn't otherwise be completed in the classroom. This keeps students learning on their own but in a fun way. For example you could set a reading and report challenge, where the students have to read one book they like in English and then write a report on it to share with their class. Another idea is to suggest an online learning course that students can follow. By maintaining and even improving their skills over breaks, English learners will return to class ready and eager to learn. Slowly Pick up the Pace Eager teachers will be tempted to cram too much into the first few classes in an attempt to excite and motivate learners. But this could have a negative effect and overwhelm students who have not be used to learning for weeks or even months. Instead, ease students into the next phase of learning by having students participate in some simple activities rather than introducing tough concepts straight away. Some examples are having students retell what they did over the holidays, or playing some learning games which will get students thinking about using the English language again, without them even realising it. After completing a few easy activities, students will be more prepared to tackle tougher exercises. Mix It Up Nothing hurts motivation more than the thought of a lengthy essay or assignment. To motivate students once again and keep them enthusiastic about learning English, think of innovative ideas to teach new language concepts rather than repetitive teaching and testing methods. Look to your own interests and the interests of the students to see how you can introduce ideas and topics but in a new way. Projects and activities with real-world applications are great as students easily understand the idea and will be excited to learn something they can put into practice. Introduce Short-Term Goals At the beginning of a new school year, it's easy for English learners to see the whole year in front of them and feel overwhelmed and unmotivated. In order for students to see the future school year in a positive light, break the time ahead into manageable chunks of short-term goals. Reflect on Your Teaching Taking some time during a break to reflect on your own teaching, could have a very positive effect on students after time off. Think about what was successful in the past, what and how did you enjoy teaching and what and how did your students enjoy learning? What could you do more off in your next classes and what could be improved? If you think it's necessary to make some changes then after a break is the perfect time to implement changes as this is less disruptive than half-way through your teaching term. Often, you will find room for improvement and the excitement you bring into the classroom with these new ideas can be motivating for the student as well. Though long breaks can be a problem, with some reflection and careful planning, English learners will enjoy coming back into the classroom to start learning again....

September 07, 2017

Employee Training - 5 Signs You Should Invest

The success of modern businesses relies on employees who have up-to-date skills such as great English communication skills and proficient technological skills. With the world changing at such a rate, the way business was conducted even just a few years ago has changed. That is why you need to invest in employee training to keep up with the times. Still not convinced? Read on for 5 signs that you should invest in your employee's education. 1. Your employees are either veterans in the field and/or new to the company If your employees fit into either of these categories, or even both, then they'll be missing some essential skills. The veterans, most likely, will be set in their ways and won't have completely mastered more efficient strategies and skills that are commonplace now. Whereas new hires will lack the necessary experience that makes them more efficient in the job. 2. You're not offering any training If you don't offer any training at all, then you need to start. There are many reasons why you should. Firstly, if you offer new hires training then developing even the most basic skills can speed up productivity. Also, training an employee makes them feel trusted and valued which means they are more likely to stay loyal to the company and work that little bit harder. 3. Your competitor is doing things better If your competitor is doing noticeably better than you, this is most likely down to how efficient they are. If you see your competitors using new processes, methods and tools, it might be time that you research how these could benefit your business. 4. You turn away or lose clients because you can't offer them what they want This should be a no-brainer, but if you're turning away clients because your employees don't have the necessary skills then it should be time to invest in employee training to give them the skills necessary to take your business to the next level. 5. Your employees are leaving for more challenging jobs If you have a high staff turnover rate, then it's probably because your employees aren't challenged enough and don't feel they can grow at your company. This is especially true with younger employees who need to feel challenged, secure and, like they can grow at a company. Many employees often state that they left their former jobs because they didn't feel like their workplace was offering any room for growth. Free or heavily-discounted employee training is a huge incentive for staff to stay loyal to your company. Their increased proficiency in turn means more productivity in certain areas. For example, in a study of over 3,100 U.S. workplaces, the National Center on the Educational Quality of the Workforce discovered that on average, a 10 percent increase in workforce education level led to an 8.6 percent gain in total productivity. Even though employers may be hesitant to invest in employees because they feel the time and money invested could be wasted, it really is a win-win for both employee and employer....

May 17, 2017

Preparing to Successfully Negotiate in English

Some people love negotiating, but I think it's fair to say that most people hate it, even in their own language, let alone in English. This is because we fear that we might be asking too much and might be turned down on our offer. We also fear that we will have to go to great lengths to prove why our offer should be accepted. This then turns a discussion into something that seems like a conflict, which we like to avoid, so then we back down. You might think that you don't need to negotiate but there are many areas where you need to negotiate every day, and those that can negotiate easily and successfully, often get more opportunities that those that don't or can't. Here are some examples of when you might have to negotiate: Asking for a raise at work Buying or selling a home Renting or leasing a property Negotiating with a supplier Agreeing on contract terms These are just some of the instances when you need to negotiate. The real key to a successful negotiation is preparation. So how can you prepare? Preparation, Preparation, Preparation Preparing for a negotiation is really the only effective way that you can increase your chances of negotiating successfully. You'll be able to play out different scenarios, ask and answer challenging questions and present the best case possible that shows the other party the benefits to them of what you are proposing. Know What You Want and Why By analysing what you want and why, you'll be able to communicate this to the other party/person. If you want a promotion or salary increase, you should think why you want this and what it means to you. You can't just go to your boss and say "I want a raise." It is highly unlikely that they will just say yes without asking any additional questions. You are going to have to say why you want it and you are going to have to persuade the other party/person that it is mutually beneficial. Before even going into a negotiation here are some good questions to ask yourself: What do I / my company want from this negotiation? What do we want to achieve? Why is this result important? What will happen if I am not successful in reaching my goal? Are there any compromises or alternatives I’m willing to accept? Is there anything I'm not willing to accept What compromises could I propose? What relationship do I have with the other party and do I want to maintain a relationship with them in the future? What are the consequences of winning/losing this negotiation? How should everyone feel when the negotiation is over? All of these questions are extremely important because in most situations you'll want to maintain a good relationship with the other party in the future and therefore the outcome of the negotiation should be as close to a win-win situation (a situation where both sides gain something from an agreement) as possible. The Other Side As well as preparing for what you want to do and say in a negotiation situation, you should also try and look at it from the other side's perspective. That way you can counter their arguments, suggest possible mutually beneficial alternatives and establish common ground. To see things from the other party's perspective you should ask yourself: What does he/she want from this negotiation? What are their goals and needs? Why is this goal important for them? What will happen if they are not successful in reaching their goal? What compromises might they accept? Is there any alternative that is definitely off-limits (unacceptable)? By considering all of the above, you'll be able to tailor your arguments specifically to their needs and explain why something that is good for you, is also good for them. You'll also be able to think of alternative arrangements that might be more in-line with their goals. Plus, you'll also be to see that there might be some compromises that are completely unacceptable to them. The last point is especially important because if you ask for something that is completely unacceptable this could lead to a breakdown in negotiations. Trust and Relationships Analysing what you want and identifying the needs of the other side puts you in a good position to create strategies that build a strong relationship with the other side. To create trust and build a relationship there are a few strategies to adopt that will help the negotiation end in a win-win situation. Honesty is the Best Policy - Being honest, genuine and confident about what you want and why makes the other party confident in you and makes you trustworthy. Creating a Connection - Negotiating is part of most relationships but the relationship is not built on negotiations. You should try to find a common like, want or goal that helps both sides connect with each other. Listen In - Listening closely to the other person, they will be more likely to open up to you if they feel that you are really listening to what they have to say. Remember - Remembering big and small details about them and about what they have said also creates a good relationship and creates trust. Key vocabulary: A raise - an increase in salary. Win-win - a situation or outcome benefits both or all parties. Mutually beneficial - a situation/effort/service/relationship that has a positive effect to both people or all parties involved (similar to win-win). Small talk - polite conversation about unimportant or uncontroversial matters. Party - a person or people forming one side in an agreement or dispute. Back down - withdraw from a negotiation, fight or argument. Compromise - Reaching agreement by each side making concessions or lowering their standards to less than what is desirable but still acceptable. Off-limits - Unacceptable and not even to be considered. Trustworthy - Able to be relied upon to be honest and truthful, someone/something you can have confidence in....

May 10, 2017